How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily Early-Onset Parkinson’s Disease: How I Got Measurable Results From Simple Changes in Lifestyle/Diet

You are searching about How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily, today we will share with you article about How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily is useful to you.

Early-Onset Parkinson’s Disease: How I Got Measurable Results From Simple Changes in Lifestyle/Diet

To get straight to the point of this article, I am 49 years old and suffer from early stage Parkinson’s disease: I have had it for 5 years now and over that time I have developed an excellent routine of exercises and diet. Unfortunately, I got depressed and lazy about 2-3 months ago, cut back on my daily exercise when “I felt like it” and ate a lot of ribs, pizza and ice cream. I gained 10 pounds fairly quickly. In response, rather than resuming good nutrition and exercise, I went on the Atkins diet which, after constantly craving pizza and hot pretzels for a good week, I quit and gained 5 more pounds.

I had become depressed, not over anything specific. In fact, this recent bout of depression seemed rather “biological”. It’s hard to say exactly what that means, except that once back in medical school, I was very depressed over a relationship gone bad. The difference was that with this relationship, this depressed feeling was almost always associated with thoughts and images of me with my then ex-girlfriend. Here, there was nothing specific that bothered me: no specific recurring thoughts about anything. In fact, I felt more hopeless and motionless than sad.

I told this to my neurologist who referred me to a psychiatrist, a calm and reassuring fatherly guy who said he was convinced that depression was a normal moment to be expected in any evolution of the disease of Parkinson, that everything was biological. He didn’t even give me an antidepressant except for the seroquel given to help me sleep but not for everyday use. He said to call her if things got worse or persisted beyond one more month. I told him about my abandoned exercise and diet routines and he felt that I would get more value out of simply forcing myself back into a better lifestyle than any antidepressant he might prescribe, with all of its potential side effects and drug interactions. I was impressed by his sense of old-fashioned logic. That must be why my neurologist regularly recommended it for his Parkinson’s patients. Neurologists are truly the engineering personalities of medicine. Every problem can be diagnosed through cold logic from proper interview, physical examination and testing. They generally avoid less logical disciplines like psychiatry. This psychiatrist was however only logic and common sense: no magic, it is enough to resume the exercise and a healthy diet.

I have developed a very solid system for assigning a single number to my level of motor functioning that works well for me. Let me explain. Although I can no longer play drums at earlier levels that would have been considered professional, I use electronic drums to do coordination exercises. Hell, if the old ladies are getting symptom improvement from playing games like bowling on their grandson’s Nintendo Wii, doing regular core drumming exercises couldn’t hurt.

I use a metronome and have a series of exercises that are all performed at exactly the same pace. The fastest pace I can drill around the battery is a very accurate measure for me of symptom severity on any given day and even time of day. For example, in my prime in my mid-twenties, there were songs running at 180 beats (eighth notes) per minute that I could easily play. One was from Rush”Tom Sawyer” if you know anything about early 80s rock. So in my prime I was comfortable playing drums on complex songs with a “driving score” of “180” ( we’ll just give it a number.) Now, without medication, I’m lucky if I can break 75 and even that is shaky and irregular. I could drill at 115 and hit 125-130 occasionally. Admittedly, it’s not near my maximum professional skill level of 180, but I’ve learned to accept this set of severe and escalating limitations. Still, I can enjoy drilling on set. It was extremely frustrating at first and once I even threw the bass drum across the room, but that’s fine now.

After indulging myself for 3 months with depression and neglectful exercise and diet, my exercise speed went from my usual average of 120 to an absolute maximum of 90. That’s a 25% drop from motor capacity for this task in just 3 months! Could I recover from this assault on my system or have more of my dear 20% dopamine neurons that were my birthright died. Eighty percent of these brain dopamine-producing neurons are already dead and gone by the time symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear in new patients.

Well, today I can proudly say that with some changes in my diet and lifestyle, I can perform my drum exercises at 125 years old. Maybe some of my dopamine neurons got sick, but it looks like they didn’t die. The added bonus was that the heavy cloud of depression that had hovered over my life for 3 long months has eased considerably and today is almost gone.

Was it depression? Diet change? Decreased exercise and all activity? I can not tell. What was making me noticeably worse got better when I made the following changes to my lifestyle:

1. Exercise: I bought the famous P90x high intensity home workout system with fitness guru Tony Horton. I don’t have the stamina to complete every daily assignment, so I break it up and do it in 20-30 minute blocks throughout the day. Some of the yoga-based balance exercises, for example, are impossible because of Parkinson’s, so I just skip those parts. I’ve also started walking around most days again and when I wake up I do a combo of push-ups/crunches/pull-ups and a dance hip flexibility exercise given to me by a dance instructor there several years ago before my right foot started dragging too much. Now I am very understanding with myself. Of course, I can’t do any of this near sea level. However, I think it’s more important to keep it regular and consistent. I will not win competitions or medals: accepted.

2. Diet : I have several rules that I abandoned during my depression that ensure a healthy diet rich in antioxidants and adequate protein:

a. Eat mostly foods in their natural state, i.e. raw/steamed/mixed vegetables and fruits (especially berries) and nuts. I buy organic wherever it’s not too expensive.

b. Minimal dairy products. Maybe milk in coffee or yogurt as part of a smoothie. Evidence of this choice is sparse but I tend to feel less bloated.

vs. No bread/pasta or wheat products. It’s personal. I get very bloated and hungrier when I indulge in wheat products. I love pizza and am grateful that a nearby restaurant makes delicious gluten-free pizza that barely tastes different from normal pizza.

D. No diet soda or other sources of aspartame or other artificial sweeteners. Sodas also contain sodium benzoate which has been accused of endangering dopaminergic neurons because it contains highly reactive benzene in its structure.

e. Protein mostly in the form of twice-daily salmon and chicken patties (I have recipes I should post later), but the George Foreman Grill has become a staple in my kitchen.

F. Occasional and minimal sweets.

g. I avoid soy products. Soy contains compounds that act like estrogen in the body. Parkinson’s has already lowered my libido, so I need all the help I can get.

h. More importantly, I never eat enough. I just leave myself feeling full or even slightly hungry after every meal.

I. I don’t avoid caffeine and I drink alcohol moderately (1-2 drinks every other day)…both are possibly neuroprotective in Parkinson’s. See previous post. Alcohol makes my daytime sleepiness worse, so I’m careful about when I choose to indulge. With Parkinson’s disease, I rarely drink even a single drink if I’m driving.

J. Eight (8) glasses of Brita filtered water daily. Filtered water has proven to be safer than bottled water which often contains residue from the plastic bottle. Also, do you really imagine that all bottled water comes from pristine mountain springs? Where are they all? I have never met any. By the way, one day I’m going to write an article about how I can prove to anyone why these ridiculously expensive alkaline water processors are a complete sham.

3. Supplements: I don’t take multivitamins because everything I bought contains manganese, a known dopamine cell killer. I take the large dose of Coenzyme q10 at 1200 mg per day. I also take a large dose of vitamin C at 3000 mg per day. Studies have suggested that vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is associated with lower rates of Parkinson’s disease, so I take 100mg daily. Ibuprofen has been shown to prevent Parkinson’s disease and can also slow mental decline, so I take 200mg in the morning. Hopefully the healthy diet above provides the other essential vitamins and minerals.

I can confidently say that following the diet above created a measurable change (via the rhythm of my drumming exercise), with my motor difficulties showing a marked improvement from what they were before the depression. Even the depression has almost completely dissipated. I hope that in my state of neglect I didn’t kill any of my surviving dopamine neurons.

Video about How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily

You can see more content about How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily

If you have any questions about How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 2261
Views: 35839363

Search keywords How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily

How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily
way How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily
tutorial How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily
How Much Milk Does An 8 Month Old Drink Daily free
#EarlyOnset #Parkinsons #Disease #Measurable #Results #Simple #LifestyleDiet

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Early-Onset-Parkinsons-Disease:-How-I-Got-Measurable-Results-From-Simple-Changes-in-Lifestyle/Diet&id=5553169

Related Posts

default-image-feature

How Much Milk Does A Two Year Old Need Uk Chocolate – Magic Beans?

You are searching about How Much Milk Does A Two Year Old Need Uk, today we will share with you article about How Much Milk Does A…

default-image-feature

How Much Milk Does A Two Year Old Need Daily My Child is Sick All the Time – Is This Normal?

You are searching about How Much Milk Does A Two Year Old Need Daily, today we will share with you article about How Much Milk Does A…

default-image-feature

How Much Milk Does A Two Year Old Baby Need Tips on How to Get Your Baby to Sleep

You are searching about How Much Milk Does A Two Year Old Baby Need, today we will share with you article about How Much Milk Does A…

default-image-feature

How Much Does The Average 8 Year Old Female Weight Cellulite Therapy – Is Endermology Right For You?

You are searching about How Much Does The Average 8 Year Old Female Weight, today we will share with you article about How Much Does The Average…

default-image-feature

How Much Does The Average 8 Year Old Boy Weight What is Polycystic Kidney Disease?

You are searching about How Much Does The Average 8 Year Old Boy Weight, today we will share with you article about How Much Does The Average…

default-image-feature

How Much Milk Does A One Year Old Need Aap Human Milk For Human Babies

You are searching about How Much Milk Does A One Year Old Need Aap, today we will share with you article about How Much Milk Does A…