How Much Milk Of Magnesia For A Two Year Old 25 Things You Can Do To Deal With Stress

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25 Things You Can Do To Deal With Stress

Believe it or not, a little stress can be good for you! There are two types of stress: good stress and bad stress. Good stress is any stress that is positive and motivating, but not a threat to your existence. Think of the birth of your first child, the purchase of your first house, a new car or winning the lottery! Bad stress, or distress, is negative and driven by anger or fear. Sometimes too much “good stress” can quickly turn into distress if it exceeds our tolerance threshold. For example, a job promotion can be seen as good stress, but if the work responsibilities associated with it are too taxing, it can become distressing. The following strategies can help manage stress and are easy to implement.

(1) The importance of private time.

Something as simple as soaking in the tub can renew your mind and body. For more relaxation, turn off the lights and put on some soft music. Some people prefer spending time with friends, while others prefer spending time alone to release stress.

(2) Learn relaxation techniques.

Read a book on relaxation techniques or take a meditation or yoga class. Here’s a simple technique you can try at home. Find 15 minutes without distractions to meditate, visualize, etc. Sit in a comfortable chair, feet on the floor, arms along the body. Breathe deeply, through your nose. Then slowly release the air through your mouth and repeat an affirmation like “Relax…Relax…Relax.” Continue inhaling and exhaling focusing on your word or phrase for 15 minutes.

(3) Schedule “worry sessions”.

Set aside 15 specific minutes each day to focus on whatever is bothering you. When worries come to mind during the day, set them aside for your “worry session.” So imagine yourself taking on a particular challenge. It’s not easy, but it’s simple and it works.

(4) Keep a journal.

New studies suggest that people who can write about their innermost feelings can enjoy better mental and physical health. Writing is also a powerful tool that helps you organize your thoughts and makes your life a little easier.

(5) Scents and sensitivity.

When you need an energy boost, take a whiff of peppermint oil or even your favorite scent. Studies suggest that certain scents may promote alertness.

(6) Power naps.

15-20 minutes during the afternoon, if you can find the time, can be very energizing and rejuvenating. However, more than 20 minutes and you might wake up feeling more tired than you started out.

(7) Reduce your workload and delegate as much as possible.

On your weekly calendar, eliminate less important tasks and activities. Delegate household chores. Ask your family members to help you with the shopping. Even if things don’t go your way, it’s important to get everyone involved so you don’t have to carry all the burdens.

(8) Reward yourself.

Engage in an activity just for you each day, provided you have accomplished something that you had planned to do that day. For example, if you finish paying your bills and then rent a movie, read, garden, etc. Not only will you increase your self-esteem, but you will also enjoy well-deserved feelings of relaxation.

(9) Smile – the easiest and best way to relieve stress!

Some smiling tips: Do something that makes you smile. We are constantly doing things to get something. It’s easy to get caught up in doing something for someone/something else. Take the time, even a few minutes, to do something you really enjoy. Project what you want to achieve. Smile at others, you get a smile back. Everyone loves giving and receiving smiles!

(10) Laugh.

Laughter is really a good medicine. Laughing increases your heart rate, stimulates circulation, exercises your diaphragm, abdominals and other muscles, and increases the production of certain “feel-good” hormones. You can watch funny TV shows, join a laugh club, or spend more time with friends who have a good sense of humor. You can also subscribe to fun online newsletters.

(11) The power of tears.

Studies show that the tears you produce when you’re anxious, upset, sad, or angry contain anti-stress hormones.

(12) Forgive and forget.

Do you bear a grudge? It can be very emotionally draining. Forgiveness is something you do for yourself, not for another individual or circumstance. Forgiving actually takes you out of the victim role, protects you, and helps you overcome any anger or frustration.

(13) Get a massage.

Various massage techniques reduce stress, relax tense muscles and increase energy. Massage also helps release endorphins (‘feel-good’ chemicals released by the brain), triggering relaxation.

(14) Stress and food choices.

Stress and boredom usually lead to poor nutrition and, consequently, weight gain. To make matters worse, escalating fatigue comes with lower energy levels and higher stress levels.

Here’s a rundown of nutrients that fight anxiety, depression, and stress. Try to incorporate these nutrients into your diet-

o Vitamin B1

Rolled oats, peanuts, lean pork, most vegetables, bran, milk.

o Vitamin B6

Wheat germ, soybeans, cantaloupe, cabbage, eggs, oats, peanuts, nuts.

o Pantothenic acid

Meat, whole grains, wheat germ, green vegetables, nuts, chicken.

o Vitamin C

Citrus fruits, berries, green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, cauliflower, peppers, potatoes.

o Vitamin B12

Beef, pork, eggs, milk, cheese.

o Choline

Green leafy vegetables, wheat germ, egg yolks

o Vitamin E

Wheat germ, soybeans, vegetable oils, nuts, Brussels sprouts, leafy greens, eggs, whole grains.

o Folic Acid

Dark green leafy vegetables, carrots, egg yolk, cantaloupe, apricots, pumpkin, avocados, beans, whole and dark rye flour.

o Zinc

Meat, seafood, wheat germ, eggs, skimmed milk powder.

o Magnesium

Figs, almonds, nuts, seeds, dark green vegetables, bananas.

o Manganese

Whole grains, nuts, green leafy vegetables, peas, beets.

o Niacin

Lean meat, wheat germ, fish, eggs, peanuts, white meat poultry, avocados.

o Calcium

Milk and dairy products, soy, sardines, salmon, peanuts, nuts, sunflower seeds, dried beans, kale, broccoli, collard greens.

It is important not only to eat healthy, but to eat all your meals (not skip any meals).

Spreading your calories out over 4-6 balanced meals a day gives you the carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals needed to keep your energy levels high by keeping your blood sugar stable.

(15) Have a “good mood” breakfast.

Combine a protein-rich food, like cottage cheese, with a fiber-rich carb, like strawberries. Protein not only stimulates the brain’s production of dopamine and norepinephrine – chemicals that keep you alert – but it also controls relaxation-inducing levels of serotonin. Carbs help you feel calm and focused.

(16) Lunch Should Be Low Fat

Grilled fish, skinless chicken, tuna, deli turkey, or chicken with a teaspoon of low-fat mayonnaise on whole-grain bread can give you energy for the afternoon.

(17) Make dinner your lightest meal.

If you have eaten a balanced and substantial lunch, you will feel surprisingly satisfied with a light dinner. Instead of a regular plate, use a smaller plate and fill it with a healthy balance of protein, carbs, and fats.

(18) Watch the caffeine.

A little caffeine is okay for a little boost. Too much and you’re working your adrenal glands. You’ll need more caffeine to get the desired effect, and the crash gets worse as it wears off.

(19) Minimize sugars and starches.

The right amount of sugar is important for energy, but too much can lower your energy level. In response to high sugar levels, the body releases insulin, which works to quickly lower blood sugar. When it drops, you feel cranky, weak, and unable to concentrate. Stick with balanced meals and snacks to maintain your blood sugar levels.

(20) Increase aerobic exercise.

In addition to cardiovascular health, aerobic exercise stimulates the production of endorphins. 25-30 minutes can significantly reduce stress and increase energy.

(21) The importance of deep breathing.

Deep breathing is an effective way to increase energy. Try this simple technique – Sit in a quiet place, feet flat on the floor, arms at your sides. Breathe deeply through your nose, filling your diaphragm (your stomach should stick out if you’re doing it right). Exhale slowly through your mouth. Do this for only 60 seconds.

(22) Reduce tension in the shoulders and neck.

Each time you notice yourself tensing around your neck and shoulders, gently shrug your shoulders ten times. Touch your chin to your chest and hold for 2 seconds. Try touching your left ear to your left shoulder (keep it relaxed – don’t reach out!) and hold for 2 seconds. Repeat for the right ear/shoulder for 2 seconds. Repeat the complete cycle if necessary.

(23) Pause to stretch.

Alternate arms, stretching upwards, stretching towards the ceiling. Five times on each side.

(24) The positive effect of exercise.

Exercise is a mood elevator. As you begin to burn fat and tighten your muscles, your energy levels will improve. Exercise increases the level of positive “feel-good” hormones, known as endorphins. Feeling good improves perceptions and personality, allowing you to make better and more positive choices. Studies show time and time again that people who work out are more optimistic and better able to handle stress.

(25) The importance of sleep.

Often the cause of stress can be traced to lack of sleep. It plays a role in our daily productivity at work, our social skills and our sense of well-being. Despite its importance, good, restful sleep remains an unsolved mystery for some people. There are times when you can fall asleep without knowing it and times when you can’t sleep no matter how hard you try.

More and more people are sleep deprived or sleep poorly. Try going to bed a little earlier and you’ll wake up happier, more satisfied, and refreshed each morning.

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